The new Stark County Manufacturing Workforce Development Partnership was created to spread valuable information about the manufacturing industry (and opportunities within it) for future workers. Twenty-four of Stark County’s more than five hundred manufacturers have already joined the organization, which aims to give its members the chance to actively participate in developing a qualified workforce.

Cedar Fair is teaming up with Esports Development Co. to expand Cedar Point Sports Center by means of a new $28 million arena. While sports would be the focus of the project, the venue could also be used for concerts, educational programs, and other events. The space will include seating for approximately 1,500 fans. The project is still in the early planning phases, but Cedar Fair hopes to open the facility in 2023.

Raymond C. Headen will be appearing with a panel of national experts, including JobsOhio General Counsel Don Grubbs, for two economic development and public finance seminars to be released in mid-September 2021. For those who are lawyers, you can receive 1 hr. CLE credit.

Economic Development Law and Regulation – Land Use Planning and Corporate Site Location

  • What role does land use planning play in the corporate site location process?
  • How can land use master plans simplify the corporate site location process for developers and companies?
  • What role does project design play in the corporate site location process?
  • How can traffic studies impact a corporate site location process?
  • What role do site plans play in preparing a site to develop the on and off-site infrastructure needed for a corporate site location process to work?

Program release date: September 13, 2021

Economic Development Law and Regulation – Incentives

  • What type of economic development incentives are used to retain and attract companies?
  • What role do economic development incentives play in a corporate site location decision?
  • Have economic development incentives adapted to the Work From Home movement?
  • What advice would you give companies seeking economic development incentives from communities and states?
  • Will economic development incentives move away from the requirements of job creation and shift to payroll and capital investment creation as automation, AI and other technologies create fewer, higher wage jobs?

Program release date: September 17, 2021

The programs will be offered by the Practising Law Institute (PLI).

The State of Ohio’s recently enacted budget bill includes economic development appropriations for Ohio Department of Development new and/or continuing programs.

Some of the major benefits of these appropriations are as follows:

  1. Broadband: The language in the budget bill strips out the Senate’s proposed limits on existing and future municipal broadband networks. $230 million is appropriated in SFY 2022 and $20 million is appropriated in SFY 2023 new broadband expansion.
  2. Ohio Rural Industrial Park Loan Program: The budget bill appropriates $15 million in both SFY 2022 and SFY 2023.  It expands the eligibility for the program beyond certain distressed areas by including rural areas in the program, which are any county not within a statistical metropolitan area (MSA), as well as transfers $20 million in unencumbered funds to SFY 2022.
  3. Main Street Job Recovery Program: The budget bill appropriates $250,000 to the Ohio Department of Development in SFY 2022 to provide grants to nonprofit organizations to create permanent business development and employment opportunities targeted to low- and moderate-income individuals or individuals of the reentry population.
  4. Sports Events Grant Program: The budget bill appropriates $10 million in SFY 2022 to fund grants awarded under R.C. 122.12 and R.C. 122.121.
  5. Meat Processing Program: The budget bill creates a new meat processing program fund within the Ohio Department of Development in order to provide up to $250,000 grants to meat processing plants for facility improvements and equipment purchases.

H.B. 110 – Ohio’s recently enacted budget bill – has changed the definition of “Public Infrastructure Improvement” in R.C, 5709.40(A) to add language which will now permit off-street parking facilities to be financed with PILOTs, including those off-street parking facilities in which all or a portion of the parking spaces are reserved, i.e. non-public, when such reserved use is determined to be necessary for economic development purposes.

H.B. 110 also enacts new R.C. 5713.083 which require owners of exempt property to notify their respective county auditor (on a to be developed Ohio Dept. of Taxation form) as to the property’s ceasing to be exempt from real property taxes, with charges imposed for an owner’s failure to so notify.

H.B. 110 lastly provides the below specificity regarding when an urban redevelopment TIF (R.C. 5709.41) commences:

  • A 5709.41 TIF exemption commences on the effective date of the TIF ordinance and with the tax year specified in the TIF ordinance so long as the year specified in the TIF ordinance commences after the  effective date of the ordinance.
  • If the 5709.41 TIF ordinance specifies a year commencing before the effective date of the ordinance or specifies no year,  the 5709.41 TIF exemption commences with the tax year in which an exempted improvement first appears on the tax list and that commences after the  effective date of the TIF ordinance.
  • In lieu of stating a specific year, the  5709.41 TIF ordinance may provide that the exemption commences in the tax year in  which the value of an improvement exceeds a specified amount or in which  the construction of one or more improvements is completed, provided that such tax year commences after the effective date of the 5709.41 TIF ordinance.
  • In lieu of stating a specific year, the 5709.41 TIF ordinance may allow for the exemption to  commence in different tax years on a parcel-by-parcel basis, with a separate  exemption term specified for each parcel. The exemption ends on the date specified in the ordinance as the date the improvement ceases to be a public purpose.

In addition to the Brownfield Remediation Grant Program, H.B. 110 also creates within Ohio Department of Development (ODOD) a new grant program (new R.C. 122.6512) that covers up to 75% of a project’s total cost to demolish commercial and residential buildings and revitalization of surrounding non-brownfield properties. The new grant program is called the Building Demolition and Site Revitalization Program. H.B. 110 provides that the Ohio Department of Development will determine eligibility for the new program via administrative rule. The program must be operational and accepting application within 90 days of budget bill’s effective date (September 29, 2021). H.B. 110 appropriates $150 million for the new program for state  fiscal year 2022. H.B. 110 further provides that $500,000 will be reserved for each Ohio county for the first year of the program with all remaining funds after such reservation awarded by ODOD on a first-come first served basis. There is authority to re-appropriate any unencumbered balance of funds in the program to SFY 2023.

Recently enacted H.B. 110, the State of Ohio’s Budget Bill, has created a new grant program (O.R.C. 122.6511) to cover up to 75% of a project’s total cost to help remediate brownfields. The program, called the Brownfield Remediation Program, resides within newly renamed Ohio Department of Development (ODOD). H.B. 110 provides that the Director of Ohio Department of Development will determine project eligibility, project sponsor eligibility and administration for the new program pursuant to administrative rule. The program must be operational and accepting application within 90 days of budget bill’s effective date (September 29, 2021). H.B. 110 appropriates $350 million for the new program for state fiscal year 2022. Of that amount, H.B 110 further provides that $1 million will be reserved for each Ohio county for the first year of the program with all remaining funds after such reservation awarded by the ODOD on a first-come, first served basis. There is authority to re-appropriate any unencumbered balance of funds in the program to state fiscal year 2023.

H.B. 110 has made certain changes to Ohio’s Joint Economic Development District (JEDD) law pursuant to newly enacted R.C. 715.72(A)(10), (11); and (J)(2). The new provisions relate both to the creation of a new JEDD or amending an existing JEDD Agreement. It requires new notices, new JEDD Agreement terms, and exclusions of land from JEDDs if any part of the JEDD is located either within one-half of one mile of a municipal corporation that is not a party to the JEDD Agreement or is within an area covered by or subject to a water or sewer service plan or agreement. Unless an owner of any such land signs the JEDD Petition, such land must be excluded from the JEDD District.

Newly enacted R.C. 122.17(A)(11) and (D)(2)(c) creates a new “megaproject” designation in the state’s Job Creation Tax Credit program. The new provisions allow a tax credit of up to 30 years for very large projects, defined as at least $1B in capital investment or $75million/year in new payroll and average wages at least 300% of the federal minimum wage. The new provisions also allow JCTC recipients to include work-from-home employees in their job creation calculations (new R.C. 122.17(T). In addition, “megaprojects” were added into the Community Reinvestment Area (CRA) program (new R.C. 3735.65(E)) authorizing local jurisdictions to award additional 15 years of tax exemptions to megaprojects.